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Old 01-07-2015, 02:29 PM   #6
glitch
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Default TR650 Strada front brake line

Strada-owners!!

Issue (TR650 Strada ABS ONLY):
Fitting either handlebar raisers or High-bend replacement bars like the Protaper ATV-High, some....SOME!!!!....bikes have shown to have faulty brake-lines installed ex factory.
The front brake line is a braided line from the master cylinder,which is crimped to a fixed, rigid section of brake-tubing from the left side of the steering head backwards (towards the ABS-unit). The braided line is twisted and the banjo-fitting at the M/C doesn't line up by about 60-110degree rotation, depending on bike!!

The braided line is tightly stretched out (to near tearing point) on full right steering lock...it's also way too short to provide any extra length for risers/high bars.
Additionally, at full LEFT lock, the crimped joiner (between rigid + flexible parts of the brake line) is moved away from the steering head tube to an extend that very well predicates metal fatigue at some point down the line, with catastrophic brake-failure a likely result.

A most critical area to fix, in my eyes.

For the start, the rigid portion of the brake-line needs to be straightened and manipulated behind the chassis-rails to create more length, while , VERY GENTLY, rotating the crimped joiner fitting to align the banjo fitting at the M/C end of the flexible line. It takes patience, a lot of "feel"... and a good eye. Too much twist and the rigid line is kinked (destroyed) needing replacement... which requires a total strip-down of the rear of the bike for access to the ABS-unit. (airbox, tank etc need to be removed for access).

Once everything fits and aligns, it's time to somehow stop the crimped joiner to move in + out to prevent metal fatigue.
It's in a bloody awkward position and there's no structure around to tie the damn thing to.


This seems to do the trick, though....
An aluminium holding clip for the front ABS brake-line joiner, as that was moving around each time the bars went side-to-side....over time, the end of the rigid brake tube will fatigue and crack.

1.5mm alum sheeting located by a tongue that's forced through a slot in the weld of the steering lock retainer-neck.

Tongue shows to the upper left in the pic.




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Old 01-07-2015, 02:36 PM   #7
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Default Sidestand-cutout switch fix

Issue: The usual sidestand-cutout switch fix.
Water/ mud + crud gets into the mechanical switch used on the Husky TR's and the damn thing won't start after one too many boghole-surfs.



A little sidestand switch mod, without cutting any wiring.

Removed plug, removed switch. Trimmed a standard automotive blade-fuse (the older, bigger style, min. 10amp) to bridge the 2 outer pins in the connector (pins 1+3). Heatshrink, done.

Another potential trouble area out of the way.














1.piece of standard heatshrink goes over the front half of the plug and the fuse to make sure that the fuse is kept in place firmly.....2. lot of adhesive heatshrink goes over the whole lot, without heating the mid-section to keep the OEM-plug fairly free of "goo", if the procedure ever needs to be reversed. Also popped a bit of heatshrink over the pin+thread that the factory switch sits on to keep corrosion down and the thread clean.







Using the fuse as the jumper keeps the option of a clean and quick reversal, going back to stock setup anytime and within minutes.
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Old 01-07-2015, 02:47 PM   #8
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Default Brake fluid weeping from Master-Cylinder

Issue: Front master cyl overfilled by dealer pre-delivery....starts to weep when it expands in hot weather and works it's way as a paint-stripper, causing heavy corrosion of all affected metal parts.


Fix: Remove cap of M/C and dab out brake-fluid with CLEAN!! rag to reduce level.
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Old 03-07-2015, 02:36 PM   #9
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Default Crappy factory bearings

Issue:
Crappy factory wheel, sprocket-carrier and headstem bearings.
The rear wheel bearings in particular have shown to pack up early and without warning, destroying the alum-wheel spacer in the process.....which
in return destroys the rear hub it sits against.
Even if a new bearing can be found locally, the molten alum-spacer and destroyed wheel-hub can take months and hundreds of $$ to repair/ replace.


It's $50 well spent on a set of good bearings and a fresh seal, all from the local bearing shop.
Might as well buy 2 sets of 6203's... and do the front wheel as well!!!
The small bearing size for a rear wheel has got me worried...make it 3 sets.









Here a copy of Jo's (Duibczek) post on Cafe Husky


Quote:
Originally Posted by duibhceK, post: 538081, member: 15985














almost ruined our plans for the coming long weekend (national holiday), but I got my hands on a nice and relatively cheap second hand rim and sprocket carrier off a Sertao.


Not entirely sure what caused it. My current theory is that the sprocket carrier bearing failed (for unknown reasons). My gf didn't notice and continued her ride. I only saw some weird play in the sprocket during the beginning of our next ride.

So I'm not sure for how many kms it was that way, but is was enough to cause serious damage to the hub and to the sprocket carrier.


I'll definitely be keeping a close eye on all other bearings on both her and my TR and am considering doing a preventive replacement of all bearings (front+rear wheel, sprocket carrier, head stock and possibly also swingarm) before we leave on our trip to Siberia next year. Either that or carry them as spares in case one fails on route...




And as for the sprocket carrier....






Unlike most other carriers on chain-driven bikes, this one has TWO bearings, side-by-side, with a small spacer in between.

Both bearings extract/ insert from one side only!!
Getting out the retainer clip between the two of them is a ...BITCH!


Sorry for the slightly blurred shot, but still clearly visible....double-depth bearing seat, showing the recess for the retainer clip about halfway.







Factory bearings are SKF Explorer 6204, 2 off...








...and a generic 30x40x7MM seal







The entire stack of bits and parts

Left-to-right as it belongs into the carrier:

1) Bearing at the bottom

2) retainer clip and spacer

3) the second bearing

4) seal







As the bearing seat is double-depth, I knocked the core out of one of the old SKF's, cutting and de-burring the outer to use as a tool

when carefully knocking in the new bearings.

Which should make for nice, smooth travel and seating of the new bearing without going askew along the way, possibly damaging the seat of the upper bearing.

The slot allows sufficient give to extract the ring after the first bearing's in place.





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Old 03-07-2015, 02:59 PM   #10
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Default Sidestand foot...extension and lift

Issue: On many/ most of the TR's the sidestand is a bit short and the foot too small, causing the bike to sink into soft groud and topple over.



Found some scrap 12mm (~1/2") alum plate in the dark recesses of the garage and wasted a lazy Sunday afternoon on this.









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